Seeing is Believing

Through Greek, Judeo-Christian, and the Post-literate societies The common interpretation of the cultural aphorism "seeing is believing"  is that "you need to see something before you can accept that it really exists or occurs." Throughout its modern usage, it is usually uttered as a rebuke to assumptions made without visual evidence. In the Oxford Dictionary… Continue reading Seeing is Believing

Havelock in the Boondocks

            Many accounts of Homer's life circulated in classical antiquity, the most prevalent being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, in present-day Turkey. His biography, written by Pseudo-Herodotus is now considered legend, the story of a blind man trapped in eternal darkness, being led to a gathering of people to recite his epics.[1] Perhaps it was… Continue reading Havelock in the Boondocks